British talent shined at this year’s Oscars with four Britons collecting the coveted golden gong – an improvement on the previous year.

Gary Oldman claimed his first Oscar as he took the best actor category for his portrayal of Winston Churchill in Darkest Hour.

In a lengthy speech, the 59-year-old star thanked almost everyone for this glorious prize.

But there was a special message for his 98-year-old mother, who Oldman said is older than the Oscars.

He said: She is 99 years young next birthday and she’s watching the ceremony from the comfort of her sofa.

I say to my mother, ‘Thank you for your love and support, put the kettle on – I’m bringing Oscar home.’

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Former Hollyoaks stars Rachel Shenton and Chris Overton, who are engaged, won an Oscar for best live action short film for The Silent Child.

Shenton shot to fame playing the glamorous Mitzee Minniver on the Channel 4 soap, while Overton played an ex-footballer turned cage fighter, Liam McAllister.

The 30-year-old actress from Stoke-on-Trent wrote, produced and starred in the film about a deaf four-year-old girl, played by deaf actress Maisie Sly, whose life is transformed when a caring social worker teaches her how to communicate.

Shenton became passionate about the issue when her father became deaf when she was 12 years old.

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She delivered her acceptance speech in sign language, saying: I made a promise to our six-year-old lead actress that I’d sign this speech.

My hands are shaking so I apologise.

She went on: Our movie is about a deaf child being born into a world of silence.

It’s not exaggerated or sensationalised for the movie, this is happening, millions of children all over the world live in silence and face communication barriers and particularly access to education.

Deafness is a silent disability, I want to say the biggest of thank you to the Academy for allowing us to put this in front of a mainstream audience.

Overton added: It’s just incredible, especially for this subject it usually gets swept under the carpet, so this is huge for deaf people.

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Roger Deakins finally clinched a gold statue for his work on his 14th nomination, winning the Oscar for best cinematography for Blade Runner 2049.

I really love my job. I have been doing it a long time as you can see, he said on stage.

One of the reasons I really love it is because of the people I work with in front of and behind the camera, he added, saying his work on the blockbuster movie was a collective effort.

The 68-year-old has previously been nominated for his work on films including The Shawshank Redemption, Fargo, No Country for Old Men, The Reader and Skyfall.

Special effects make-up artist Lucy Sibbick won in the make-up and hair category for Darkest Hour, alongside to non-Britons Kazuhiro Tsuji and David Malinowski.

Sibbick, who spent in excess of 15 hours a day transforming Oldman into war-time prime minister Churchill, praised the actor for his patience.

She said: He’s such good fun and really patient and just a lovely generous character.

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(c) Sky News 2018: Oscars: The Brits who won Hollywood’s most coveted prize